Jessica Simpson, Jennifer Hudson, And The Post-baby-body Instagram Trend That Has Us Scratching Our Heads | Parenting – Yahoo Shine

Big Brother 16 Spoilers: Caleb Reynolds Racist Instagram Post | Celeb Dirty Laundry

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“This is my big, like, middle finger to the world on everyone that called me fat,” Kim Jay Leno, adding that the public scrutiny of her pregnancy weight gain, “really hurt my soul.” She went on to say that losing the weight was “the hardest challenge of [her] life.” Related: 10 Smart Food Swaps for Faster Weight Loss That’s right, it took Kim Kardashian to articulate the problem here. The constant media attention and public fixation on pregnant women’s bodies (whether the person is a celebrity or not) has turned a perfectly natural biological and evolutionary process–gaining weight to nourish a fetus, then shedding some or all of that weight once the baby arrives–into a Herculean challenge at which we can either succeed or fail. Since it’s been turned into this battle to be won, the trend has emerged of sharing a photo on social media to declare victory. And when said photo gets shared, people write articles pointing out that someone “achieved her weight goal about two years ago and hasn’t slipped since.” Imagine losing weight, feeling great about yourself, and sharing a photo of your happiness–only to have someone remark that you haven’t “slipped” yet. It’s so undermining. In these photos, clearly taken at moments of contentment, Jessica, Jennifer, and other women shouldn’t have to question if they have the “right” to share them or whether or not one “should” pose proudly in a bathing suit. Kim shouldn’t have to call her photo a “big middle finger” to body-shamers. In Pantene’s new campaign, “Sorry, Not Sorry,” they urge women to stop apologizing for seemingly innocuous things, saying it’s instagram likes a crutch which displaces our power. The post-baby Instagram bathing suit trend is a perfect example.

Original article here: https://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/jessica-simpson-jennifer-hudson-post-baby-body-instagram-180800989.html

Instagram tips for small businesses – The Denver Post

In this photo provided by Josey Orr and posted in May 2014 to the Instagram account of his company, Dyer and Jenkins, Orr models some of his

You agree with fags? I guess so but I dont agree with murdering an innocent baby which he clearly doesnt mind. Nothin has changed in the last four years. You know it. Your just a democrat who wants that Muslim monkey in office. Im done with you. Youre dismissed. Since the post on Instagram was discovered by the media it was quickly deleted from Caleb Reynolds page; however, whoever did the deleting was a little too late because there are screenshots all over the internet of it. One has to wonder how a multimillion dollar franchise like Big Brother didnt find something so negative and racist on one of their potential houseguests.

Original article here: http://www.celebdirtylaundry.com/2014/big-brother-16-spoilers-bb16-house-guest-caleb-reynolds-racist-instagram-post-bb15-scandal-all-over-again/

This photo posted in May 2014 to the Instagram account of Peridot Sweets Las Vegas, shows Tiffany Jones, left, with one of her creations, an 8-tier cake made for Morrow Meadows. (Tiffany Jones/Peridot Sweets Las Vegas) Women’s clothing shop and online store (3) UOI Boutique broadcasts its customers’ Instagram photos on its website. When someone uploads a picture of a skirt or top or necklace on Instagram with the hashtag #uoionline, it automatically shows up on uoionline.com . The Sterling, Ill., company also asks its 25 workers to take at least one photo with their smartphone during their shifts. The best are uploaded to UOI Boutique’s Instagram account. Hashtag everything Tim Parsons posted this photo of his Adoboloco product with tacos at La Tienda Del Sol in Kihei, Hawaii. (Tim Fernandes-Parsons/Adoboloco ) The right hashtag can attract customers from far away. Brooke Sacco, the owner of (4) Behind The Moon, a shop that sells used and new kids clothing in Hammonton, N.J., uploaded a photo of a pair of outfits with the hashtag of the clothing’s brand name. A potential customer in Dallas was searching for that brand on Instagram and asked Sacco to send the $7 dress and romper to Texas. It was the first time Sacco had shipped clothing to customers since she opened the store in April.

Original article here: http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_26004357/instagram-tipsfor-small-businesses

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